Posted in Protein

Be quick!

Posted by Julie Dundon AdvAPD on 8 July 2020
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With the limitations of COVID19, we are now delivering our highly regarded 2-day Improving Nutrition Seminars over 10 live web events! 

 

Yesterday, we presented the first Module (of 10) and will be continuing to present the next 9 each fortnight.

 

While we have found the IT a little daunting, COVID 19 has made us move out of our comfort zone and we are loving the challenge.

 

The result - more accessible and more affordable evidence-based nutrition information for all staff working in the aged care sector. The final result - a better quality of life for our residents.

 

Our current program is completely sold out and we have just set the next one to commence on Thursday 30 July.

 

Message your email address to me and we can send you the link when it's live....but be quick as we will have limited places!

Protein at every meal!

Posted by Julie Dundon AdvAPD on 21 April 2020
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During this time when aged care homes are isolating the residents from families and visitors, we know that they are more likely to feel lonely and puts them at a higher nutritional risk. 
We must ACT NOW and make food and nutrition a priority, or we are likely to see our most vulnerable have poorer health outcomes, with an increased incidence of wounds, falls, infections and even death.
Some things to do to ensure that the risk is being managed include:

NPA Hint no. 6

Protein also needs to be included at each main meal. Offer a cooked breakfast more often or even every day.  Eggs, baked beans and even smoothies are great options for breakfast.  Make sure that all soups include a protein source, such as meat, chicken, legumes. Limit convenience food items with very low protein contents, eg vegetable patties, commercial crumbed fish, party pies and pasta dishes with little or no meat.

Malnutrition vs Weight Loss

Posted by Julie Dundon AdvAPD on 9 April 2020
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During this time when aged care homes are isolating the residents from families and visitors, we know that they are more likely to feel lonely and puts them at a higher nutritional risk.

We must ACT NOW and make food and nutrition a priority, or we are likely to see our most vulnerable have poorer health outcomes, with an increased incidence of wounds, falls, infections and even death.

Some things to do to ensure that the risk is being managed include:

NPA Hint No. 2

Ensure that the resident's malnutrition risk is identified routinely by using a validated malnutrition screening and assessment tool.  This is not just about weight loss.  It is expected that the nutrition risk will be identified before there is weight loss.  It is much harder to increase weight than to prevent weight loss.

 

Communication is the Key!

Posted by Julie Dundon AdvAPD on 27 February 2020
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Residents in an aged care setting must receive the correct meal at the correct time, every day.  

If a resident has a special dietary need, the details are recorded in the resident's care plan and communicated carefully to the kitchen staff to ensure all the dietary limitations are actioned.  More importantly the resident is not unnecessarily restricted and as many choices are provided as possible. We can use a range of communication methods to ensure that this occurs. 

The system for communication between nursing staff and kitchen staff should be effective, simple and safe.  A Dietitian and Speech Pathologist often contribute to this food and nutrition care plan and will also communicate directly with the kitchen staff.  The resident's dietary details list will need to be maintained.  So, when there is a change for a resident, that change is immediately communicated with the kitchen and any lists used are immediately updated.

It must be very clear whose responsibility it is to update all lists to ensure they are accurate and reflect the residents' current dietary needs. These lists must also be referred to whenever providing food or fluids to any residents.

What system of communication do you use? Are you relying on paperwork or do you use a clinical software system? Are you using a dedicated food service software system? Reports from client software packages can ensure that all information is up to date at all times and they can generate usable lists that can be referred to in the kitchen.  A key factor is to keep the system that you use simple. Minimise the number of lists- the more lists there are, the more likely it is that they will not match.

When NPA conduct audits of nutrition care it is very common to find anomalies when comparing the care plans with lists in the kitchen.  Regular audits should be undertaken by the care home to ensure integrity of the information and to provide reassurance that the right meal is provided to the right person.

Nothing Standard About Standard Recipes

Posted by Julie Dundon AdvAPD on 23 January 2020
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Do you use standard recipes in your aged care home? There are many good reasons to use a standard recipe when cooking for older people. The 2 most important are:

  • to keep the residents safe and
  • to meet the expectations of the residents.

We all know that some Chefs or cooks can cook an amazing meal that no-one else can seem to replicate.  It is important that the recipe is documented so that others can get as close to their finished product as possible.  This should result in a high standard of quality across the whole menu.

Also, using a standard recipe will ensure that all the ingredients are available when needed, there will be enough food to feed all the residents and allergens can be managed.  This way all residents can enjoy the same meal with some modifications.

Make sure that the standard recipes are always available to all the cooking staff.  A clean folder in the office around the corner that no-one looks at, just might indicate that the recipes are not followed.  An easy to follow recipe which is available in the production area and that indicates the number of serves is a very useful tool.

People in residential aged care spend a lot of their time thinking about food.  If they expect a meal to look and taste the same way that they had previously, we need to ensure that we can do this every time.  A standard recipe should be able to deliver this!

About the Author Nutrition Professionals Australia is a team of Accredited Practising Dietitians who consult to aged care homes across Australia.  They have more than 40 years of combined experience in a range of roles, as Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitians, Food Services Coordinator, Residential Site Manager, Author of Nutrition Manuals and Consultant Dietitian.roles, as Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitians, Food Services Coordinator, Residential Site Manager, Author of Nutrition Manuals and Consultant Dietitian.

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